Marc's Guidebook

Marc
Marc's Guidebook

Neighbourhoods

The Chiesa di Trinità dei Monti is perhaps better known for its location than for the works inside it. This little jewel has evolved with the centuries to become one of the most famous post cards of the Eternal City. It stands atop the Spanish Steps, overlooking the Piazza di Spagna forming a backdrop that cannot be ignored. And yet, until the early 1500s, the church site was an enormous vineyard donated by King Charles VIII of France to an order of monks. From the 16th century on, the entire area around the Trinità dei Monti had long been under French influence; in the 19th century, this influence expanded somewhat to include the Villa Medici and the French Academy. The French provided the funds for the celebrated Spanish Steps, which were built some time around 1725 by Francesco De Sanctis. Their purpose was to celebrate the peace between France and Spain by linking the Piazza di Spagna (so called because of a road leading to the Bourbon Spanish Embassy) to the French church. In addition, of the two clocks on the façade, one shows Rome time, the other Paris time; mass is celebrated in the church in the French. The first part of the church was built in the Gothic style in the early decades of the 1500s; the place of worship was consecrated in 1585 by Pope Sixtus V. Afterwards, in the 16th century, the Gothic building was enlarged, and the famous façade with two symmetrical bell towers was built. The design was by Giacomo Della Porta and Domenico Fontana. The latter also created the stair and ramps that lead to the church entrance. In the late 18th century, Pope Pius VI placed the Salustiano Obelisk in front of the Trinità dei Monti. This was the last large obelisk to be erected by the Roman Papacy from those that had been built in Roman times to imitate Egyptian obelisks. On the interior, the beautiful Deposition of Christ and the entire Mannerist-style fresco cycle in one of the first chapels are the work of Daniele da Volterra, a student of Michelangelo, who after the master's death got the nickname “braghettone”(“Breeches-Maker”). He was charged with the task of covering the nudity in the Last Judgment in the Sistine Chapel with trousers.
Piazza della Trinità dei Monti
The Chiesa di Trinità dei Monti is perhaps better known for its location than for the works inside it. This little jewel has evolved with the centuries to become one of the most famous post cards of the Eternal City. It stands atop the Spanish Steps, overlooking the Piazza di Spagna forming a backdrop that cannot be ignored. And yet, until the early 1500s, the church site was an enormous vineyard donated by King Charles VIII of France to an order of monks. From the 16th century on, the entire area around the Trinità dei Monti had long been under French influence; in the 19th century, this influence expanded somewhat to include the Villa Medici and the French Academy. The French provided the funds for the celebrated Spanish Steps, which were built some time around 1725 by Francesco De Sanctis. Their purpose was to celebrate the peace between France and Spain by linking the Piazza di Spagna (so called because of a road leading to the Bourbon Spanish Embassy) to the French church. In addition, of the two clocks on the façade, one shows Rome time, the other Paris time; mass is celebrated in the church in the French. The first part of the church was built in the Gothic style in the early decades of the 1500s; the place of worship was consecrated in 1585 by Pope Sixtus V. Afterwards, in the 16th century, the Gothic building was enlarged, and the famous façade with two symmetrical bell towers was built. The design was by Giacomo Della Porta and Domenico Fontana. The latter also created the stair and ramps that lead to the church entrance. In the late 18th century, Pope Pius VI placed the Salustiano Obelisk in front of the Trinità dei Monti. This was the last large obelisk to be erected by the Roman Papacy from those that had been built in Roman times to imitate Egyptian obelisks. On the interior, the beautiful Deposition of Christ and the entire Mannerist-style fresco cycle in one of the first chapels are the work of Daniele da Volterra, a student of Michelangelo, who after the master's death got the nickname “braghettone”(“Breeches-Maker”). He was charged with the task of covering the nudity in the Last Judgment in the Sistine Chapel with trousers.
he Monti neighborhood of Rome: what to see and what you need to know about Rome’s most scenic district. The Monti District, or Rione Monti as it called in Italian, is one of the most scenic neighborhoods in Rome. Located in the city center, roughly between the Colosseum and Termini station, is an ancient area with a long and interesting history and now charms its visitors and inhabitants with cobbled streets, small alleys, important churches, cool restaurants and independent shops. A visit to this area is a must when in Rome. Whether you opt for aperitivo here, a visit to one of its stunning churches or a leisurely walk to take in the atmosphere, what you will find here is quintessential Rome: grand, dusty, busy, lazy, messy, stunning and always unique. I always head to Monti when I feel like a walk and I can never decide if I love more its dusty cobbled streets or its important monuments. I simply adore both! Out of the many, these are in my opinion, the best things to see in Monti.
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Monti
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he Monti neighborhood of Rome: what to see and what you need to know about Rome’s most scenic district. The Monti District, or Rione Monti as it called in Italian, is one of the most scenic neighborhoods in Rome. Located in the city center, roughly between the Colosseum and Termini station, is an ancient area with a long and interesting history and now charms its visitors and inhabitants with cobbled streets, small alleys, important churches, cool restaurants and independent shops. A visit to this area is a must when in Rome. Whether you opt for aperitivo here, a visit to one of its stunning churches or a leisurely walk to take in the atmosphere, what you will find here is quintessential Rome: grand, dusty, busy, lazy, messy, stunning and always unique. I always head to Monti when I feel like a walk and I can never decide if I love more its dusty cobbled streets or its important monuments. I simply adore both! Out of the many, these are in my opinion, the best things to see in Monti.
Piazza Navona is one of the most beautiful and famous squares in the centre of Rome. In 86 CE, emperor Domitian commissioned this square with its unique, elongated shape. This shape is the result of its original function as the stadium for athletics competitions (Circus Agonalis) with stands for 20,000 spectators. Pope Innocent even organised so-called ‘water games’ during the hot summer months, for which the whole square was put under water. After the fall of the Roman Empire, houses were built where the stands used to be, but the long athletics field remained free of buildings and would later become Piazza Navona.
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Piazza Navona
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Piazza Navona is one of the most beautiful and famous squares in the centre of Rome. In 86 CE, emperor Domitian commissioned this square with its unique, elongated shape. This shape is the result of its original function as the stadium for athletics competitions (Circus Agonalis) with stands for 20,000 spectators. Pope Innocent even organised so-called ‘water games’ during the hot summer months, for which the whole square was put under water. After the fall of the Roman Empire, houses were built where the stands used to be, but the long athletics field remained free of buildings and would later become Piazza Navona.
Overlooking Rome's historic center is the Vatican, the world's smallest sovereign state. It boasts some of Italy's most famous artworks, many housed in the massive Vatican Museums (home of the Sistine Chapel), as well as a slew of fine eateries and souvenir stores and the famed St Peter's Basilica. Most pilgrims flock to the Vatican during significant times of the liturgical year, such as Christmas or Easter.
Vatican City
Overlooking Rome's historic center is the Vatican, the world's smallest sovereign state. It boasts some of Italy's most famous artworks, many housed in the massive Vatican Museums (home of the Sistine Chapel), as well as a slew of fine eateries and souvenir stores and the famed St Peter's Basilica. Most pilgrims flock to the Vatican during significant times of the liturgical year, such as Christmas or Easter.
Around the Gallerie Borghese on Pincio hill, you will find the former estate that had been owned by the wealthy Borghese family since 1580. Cardinal Scipione Borghese commissioned the vineyard to be converted into a park. Building of the Villa Borghese Pinciana was completed in 1633. It also included the construction of other buildings, including an aviary and orangery. During the 19th century the park received a major overhaul and converted to the English style with various ponds and fountains. Eventually, the park was bought by the municipality of Rome in 1903 and was made a public park. It is now the largest park in Rome and a perfect place to get away from the bustle of the city.
piazzale Napoleone I
Around the Gallerie Borghese on Pincio hill, you will find the former estate that had been owned by the wealthy Borghese family since 1580. Cardinal Scipione Borghese commissioned the vineyard to be converted into a park. Building of the Villa Borghese Pinciana was completed in 1633. It also included the construction of other buildings, including an aviary and orangery. During the 19th century the park received a major overhaul and converted to the English style with various ponds and fountains. Eventually, the park was bought by the municipality of Rome in 1903 and was made a public park. It is now the largest park in Rome and a perfect place to get away from the bustle of the city.
Literally translated, Campo de 'Fiori means 'field of flowers', a name derived from the Middle Ages when the area was still a meadow full of flowers. It is a misunderstanding that the name of the rectangular square is derived from the flower market that frequently takes place here. The square is very lively and colorful in the morning because of the daily fresh market with flowers, fruit, herbs and vegetables (monday to saturday). In the evening (especially by tourists) there is a lot of drinking on the terraces and in the bars around the lively square. The square is not far from the famous Piazza Navona, a square which in my opinion is much more worth a visit than this overrated Camp de 'Fiori.
Piazza Campo de' Fiori
Literally translated, Campo de 'Fiori means 'field of flowers', a name derived from the Middle Ages when the area was still a meadow full of flowers. It is a misunderstanding that the name of the rectangular square is derived from the flower market that frequently takes place here. The square is very lively and colorful in the morning because of the daily fresh market with flowers, fruit, herbs and vegetables (monday to saturday). In the evening (especially by tourists) there is a lot of drinking on the terraces and in the bars around the lively square. The square is not far from the famous Piazza Navona, a square which in my opinion is much more worth a visit than this overrated Camp de 'Fiori.
This busy and lively neighborhood has the look and feel of a traditional small Italian town, with people shopping, chatting, drinking espresso and going about their daily business.
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Trastevere
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This busy and lively neighborhood has the look and feel of a traditional small Italian town, with people shopping, chatting, drinking espresso and going about their daily business.
Planned by Valadier at the beginning of the 19th century, this is considered one of the best urban works in Rome.
Piazza del Popolo
Planned by Valadier at the beginning of the 19th century, this is considered one of the best urban works in Rome.
QUARTIERE COPPEDÈ IS AN UNEXPECTED and bizarre area in Rome, nestled within the Trieste district in the northern part of the city. The fantastical mix of Ancient Greek, Roman Baroque, Mannerist, Medieval, and, overall, Art Nouveau mishmash was brought to life by Florentine architect Gino Coppedè (from whom the quarter itself takes its current name) in 1919. Coppedè worked on the quarter until his death in 1927.
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Via Gino Coppedè
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QUARTIERE COPPEDÈ IS AN UNEXPECTED and bizarre area in Rome, nestled within the Trieste district in the northern part of the city. The fantastical mix of Ancient Greek, Roman Baroque, Mannerist, Medieval, and, overall, Art Nouveau mishmash was brought to life by Florentine architect Gino Coppedè (from whom the quarter itself takes its current name) in 1919. Coppedè worked on the quarter until his death in 1927.
The Via del Corso is a main street in the historical centre of Rome. It is straight in an area otherwise characterized by narrow meandering alleys and small piazzas.
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Via del Corso
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The Via del Corso is a main street in the historical centre of Rome. It is straight in an area otherwise characterized by narrow meandering alleys and small piazzas.
The Jewish ghetto of Rome is one of the most beautiful hidden treasures of the city. Visiting this small neighborhood, delimited by the Tiber river on one side and by Venice Square on the other, is not only a cultural and religious experience, because of the Synagoghe and the Jewish museum, but also a culinary one, thanks to the many typical restaurants scattered throughout the ghetto.
Piazza del Ghetto
The Jewish ghetto of Rome is one of the most beautiful hidden treasures of the city. Visiting this small neighborhood, delimited by the Tiber river on one side and by Venice Square on the other, is not only a cultural and religious experience, because of the Synagoghe and the Jewish museum, but also a culinary one, thanks to the many typical restaurants scattered throughout the ghetto.

Sightseeing

Trevi Fountain, Italian Fontana di Trevi, fountain in Rome that is considered a late Baroque masterpiece and is arguably the best known of the city’s numerous fountains. It was designed by Nicola Salvi and completed by Giuseppe Pannini in 1762. According to legend, those who toss coins into its waters will return to Rome.
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Trevi Fountain
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Trevi Fountain, Italian Fontana di Trevi, fountain in Rome that is considered a late Baroque masterpiece and is arguably the best known of the city’s numerous fountains. It was designed by Nicola Salvi and completed by Giuseppe Pannini in 1762. According to legend, those who toss coins into its waters will return to Rome.
The Castel Sant’Angelo was built in the 2nd century as a mausoleum by order of emperor Hadrian. The mausoleum did not become associated with the name of archangel Michael until 590, when Pope Gregory I saw archangel Michael sheathe his sword on top of the mausoleum during a plague to signal the end of the epidemic. Later pope Pius II built a chapel at the site where the archangel was said to have appeared. The remarkable bronze statue of archangel Michael was made in 1753 by Peter Anton von Verschaffelt. The Castle of the Holy Angel in Rome also owes a lot of its fame to the film adaptation of Dan Brown's Angels & Demons, where the castle served as a hideout for the Illuminati.
Via Castel Sant'Angelo
The Castel Sant’Angelo was built in the 2nd century as a mausoleum by order of emperor Hadrian. The mausoleum did not become associated with the name of archangel Michael until 590, when Pope Gregory I saw archangel Michael sheathe his sword on top of the mausoleum during a plague to signal the end of the epidemic. Later pope Pius II built a chapel at the site where the archangel was said to have appeared. The remarkable bronze statue of archangel Michael was made in 1753 by Peter Anton von Verschaffelt. The Castle of the Holy Angel in Rome also owes a lot of its fame to the film adaptation of Dan Brown's Angels & Demons, where the castle served as a hideout for the Illuminati.
Roman Forum, Latin Forum Romanum, most important forum in ancient Rome, situated on low ground between the Palatine and Capitoline hills. The Roman Forum was the scene of public meetings, law courts, and gladiatorial combats in republican times and was lined with shops and open-air markets. Under the empire, when it primarily became a centre for religious and secular spectacles and ceremonies, it was the site of many of the city’s most imposing temples and monuments.
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Forum Romanum
5/6 Via della Salara Vecchia
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Roman Forum, Latin Forum Romanum, most important forum in ancient Rome, situated on low ground between the Palatine and Capitoline hills. The Roman Forum was the scene of public meetings, law courts, and gladiatorial combats in republican times and was lined with shops and open-air markets. Under the empire, when it primarily became a centre for religious and secular spectacles and ceremonies, it was the site of many of the city’s most imposing temples and monuments.
Ostia is a large neighbourhood in the X Municipio of the comune of Rome, Italy, near the ancient port of Rome, which is now a major archaeological site known as Ostia Antica. Ostia is also the only municipio or district of Rome on the Tyrrhenian Sea, and many Romans spend the summer holidays there. Wikipedia
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Ostia
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Ostia is a large neighbourhood in the X Municipio of the comune of Rome, Italy, near the ancient port of Rome, which is now a major archaeological site known as Ostia Antica. Ostia is also the only municipio or district of Rome on the Tyrrhenian Sea, and many Romans spend the summer holidays there. Wikipedia
Just about any of the Castelli Romani - as the small towns nestled in the hills to the south of Rome are known - are more than worth a visit, but our favourite is bustling Frascati. Dominated by the extraordinary Baroque summer palace of Pope Clement VII Aldobrandini, the town has been a go-to destination for Romans seeking to escape the summer heat for millennia. Narrow lanes and hidden piazzas open out onto breathtaking views of the Roman campagna on all sides, but the real draw of Frascati is its brilliant restaurant scene. The Castelli Romani are known for the unrivalled quality of its raw materials, and an array of restaurants, from cheap and rustic fraschette to well-heeled eateries see hungry Romans descend every weekend in search of a cracking Sunday lunch (porchetta is, of course, obligatory). When in Rome, do as the Romans do!
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Frascati
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Just about any of the Castelli Romani - as the small towns nestled in the hills to the south of Rome are known - are more than worth a visit, but our favourite is bustling Frascati. Dominated by the extraordinary Baroque summer palace of Pope Clement VII Aldobrandini, the town has been a go-to destination for Romans seeking to escape the summer heat for millennia. Narrow lanes and hidden piazzas open out onto breathtaking views of the Roman campagna on all sides, but the real draw of Frascati is its brilliant restaurant scene. The Castelli Romani are known for the unrivalled quality of its raw materials, and an array of restaurants, from cheap and rustic fraschette to well-heeled eateries see hungry Romans descend every weekend in search of a cracking Sunday lunch (porchetta is, of course, obligatory). When in Rome, do as the Romans do!
The Pantheon is a former Roman temple and since 609 AD, a Catholic church, in Rome, Italy, on the site of an earlier temple commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during the reign of Augustus. It was rebuilt by the emperor Hadrian and probably dedicated c. 126 AD.
Via del Pantheon
The Pantheon is a former Roman temple and since 609 AD, a Catholic church, in Rome, Italy, on the site of an earlier temple commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during the reign of Augustus. It was rebuilt by the emperor Hadrian and probably dedicated c. 126 AD.
The Sistine Chapel is a chapel in the Apostolic Palace, in Vatican City and the official residence of the pope. Originally known as the Cappella Magna, the chapel takes its name from Pope Sixtus IV, who had it built between 1473 and 1481.
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Sistine Chapel
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The Sistine Chapel is a chapel in the Apostolic Palace, in Vatican City and the official residence of the pope. Originally known as the Cappella Magna, the chapel takes its name from Pope Sixtus IV, who had it built between 1473 and 1481.
The commercial, political and religious center of ancient Rome, which features the Arch of Septimus Severus, Temple of Saturn, Arch of Titus and the House of the Vestals.
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Palatium
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The commercial, political and religious center of ancient Rome, which features the Arch of Septimus Severus, Temple of Saturn, Arch of Titus and the House of the Vestals.
Close to many tourist attractions such as the Roman Forum and Capitol Hill, this large sunny square is the true hub of Rome, which features the impressive monument of King Vittorio Emmanuele II.
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Piazza Venezia
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Close to many tourist attractions such as the Roman Forum and Capitol Hill, this large sunny square is the true hub of Rome, which features the impressive monument of King Vittorio Emmanuele II.
The ruins of ancient Rome's public bathhouse, dating back to the 3rd century.
Viale delle Terme di Caracalla
The ruins of ancient Rome's public bathhouse, dating back to the 3rd century.
Via Appia Antica, or the Appian Way, is the reason why we hear the phrase ‘all roads lead to Rome‘. This ancient and storied path connected Rome to the port town of Brindisi and enabled movement and trade to flourish throughout the empire. With its large cobblestones now smooth from the course of centuries, Via Appia Antica boasts an intriguing and lengthy history closely tied to the rise of Rome.
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Via Appia Antica
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Via Appia Antica, or the Appian Way, is the reason why we hear the phrase ‘all roads lead to Rome‘. This ancient and storied path connected Rome to the port town of Brindisi and enabled movement and trade to flourish throughout the empire. With its large cobblestones now smooth from the course of centuries, Via Appia Antica boasts an intriguing and lengthy history closely tied to the rise of Rome.
You start your visit first with the museum of the crypt of the Capuchins. Here you will learn more about the history of the Capuchins and the crypts. This museum includes a work by Caravaggio on which Saint Francis is painted. Then you will visit the crypt; this moderately lit crypt consists of five chapels, each of which is decorated with bones, skulls and sometimes even complete skeletons and one boneless chapel with the altar. You finish the tour in the last chapel with the special message ‘Quello che voi siete noi eravamo, quello che noi siamo voi sarete’ (translated “Exactly what you are now, we once were, what we are now will become you. Afterwards you can also visit the associated church 'Santa Maria della Concezione dei Cappuccini'.
Museum and Crypt of the Capuchin Friars
27 Via Vittorio Veneto
You start your visit first with the museum of the crypt of the Capuchins. Here you will learn more about the history of the Capuchins and the crypts. This museum includes a work by Caravaggio on which Saint Francis is painted. Then you will visit the crypt; this moderately lit crypt consists of five chapels, each of which is decorated with bones, skulls and sometimes even complete skeletons and one boneless chapel with the altar. You finish the tour in the last chapel with the special message ‘Quello che voi siete noi eravamo, quello che noi siamo voi sarete’ (translated “Exactly what you are now, we once were, what we are now will become you. Afterwards you can also visit the associated church 'Santa Maria della Concezione dei Cappuccini'.
You start your visit first with the museum of the crypt of the Capuchins. Here you will learn more about the history of the Capuchins and the crypts. This museum includes a work by Caravaggio on which Saint Francis is painted. Then you will visit the crypt; this moderately lit crypt consists of five chapels, each of which is decorated with bones, skulls and sometimes even complete skeletons and one boneless chapel with the altar. You finish the tour in the last chapel with the special message ‘Quello che voi siete noi eravamo, quello che noi siamo voi sarete’ (translated “Exactly what you are now, we once were, what we are now will become you. Afterwards you can also visit the associated church 'Santa Maria della Concezione dei Cappuccini'.
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Janiculum Terrace
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You start your visit first with the museum of the crypt of the Capuchins. Here you will learn more about the history of the Capuchins and the crypts. This museum includes a work by Caravaggio on which Saint Francis is painted. Then you will visit the crypt; this moderately lit crypt consists of five chapels, each of which is decorated with bones, skulls and sometimes even complete skeletons and one boneless chapel with the altar. You finish the tour in the last chapel with the special message ‘Quello che voi siete noi eravamo, quello che noi siamo voi sarete’ (translated “Exactly what you are now, we once were, what we are now will become you. Afterwards you can also visit the associated church 'Santa Maria della Concezione dei Cappuccini'.

Shopping

Trevi Fountain, Italian Fontana di Trevi, fountain in Rome that is considered a late Baroque masterpiece and is arguably the best known of the city’s numerous fountains. It was designed by Nicola Salvi and completed by Giuseppe Pannini in 1762. According to legend, those who toss coins into its waters will return to Rome.
Outlet
Trevi Fountain, Italian Fontana di Trevi, fountain in Rome that is considered a late Baroque masterpiece and is arguably the best known of the city’s numerous fountains. It was designed by Nicola Salvi and completed by Giuseppe Pannini in 1762. According to legend, those who toss coins into its waters will return to Rome.

Food scene

A great place to eat. SoulKitchen is a place, but it is also a time. What passes and is not lost, the time of the song that you do not expect but that you know by heart, of the page that tells everything in detail and you find yourself smiling and nodding your head, the time of dishes with memories inside and glasses with memories outside, unsigned stories and coffee with three "c's". SoulKitchen is yours but it's also hers, the one sitting next to you, it's everyone's so it's nobody's, but it's always open, except on Mondays. https://lacucinadellanima.it/
Via dei Sabelli, 193
193 Via dei Sabelli
A great place to eat. SoulKitchen is a place, but it is also a time. What passes and is not lost, the time of the song that you do not expect but that you know by heart, of the page that tells everything in detail and you find yourself smiling and nodding your head, the time of dishes with memories inside and glasses with memories outside, unsigned stories and coffee with three "c's". SoulKitchen is yours but it's also hers, the one sitting next to you, it's everyone's so it's nobody's, but it's always open, except on Mondays. https://lacucinadellanima.it/
Well-presented small plates that tell the story of the land, served in a casual dining room with just two communal tables (and a six-seat chef’s counter serving a 20-bites tasting menu) are the order of the day at this exciting wine shop, pasta bar and restaurant. Chefs Giuseppe Lo Iudice and Alessandro Miocchi forage every week in several pristine areas of Abruzzo and the menu reads like a dialogue between them and the region’s best artisan farmers. Expect unusual flavour pairings such as wild boar tartare with grilled squid, as well as a clever wine list focusing on small producers.
Via Ugo Bartolomei, 18
18 Via Ugo Bartolomei
Well-presented small plates that tell the story of the land, served in a casual dining room with just two communal tables (and a six-seat chef’s counter serving a 20-bites tasting menu) are the order of the day at this exciting wine shop, pasta bar and restaurant. Chefs Giuseppe Lo Iudice and Alessandro Miocchi forage every week in several pristine areas of Abruzzo and the menu reads like a dialogue between them and the region’s best artisan farmers. Expect unusual flavour pairings such as wild boar tartare with grilled squid, as well as a clever wine list focusing on small producers.
Restaurant, gastronomy, cold cuts and cheese counter. Wines and spirits, takeaway and home deliveries In the heart of the capital, a few steps from Campo de’ Fiori, a historic restaurant with a menu based on large ingredients, on the constant dialogue with the salami counter. And cheeses and on a real, Roman and Italian cuisine...The book "Roscioli, bread, cooking and Rome" At the end of the 1950s, 11 brothers and cousins ​​arrived in Rome from Rocca di Montemonaco, a small town in the Marche region. They will all end up being bakers in the capital. Thus begins, with the story of Marco, the book "Roscioli the bread, the kitchen and Rome", a book that tells about a family, the hard work, the evolutions and the search for an ancient Roman oven. Written by Elisia Menduni, with photos by Maurizio Camagna, published by the publisher Giunti in 2016, the book, in addition to proposing 30 iconic recipes of the Oven, of the Salumeria Roscioli Restaurant and of the Roscioli Coffee, also extends into the ancient roots of the capital's bread-making , from the Romans to today. https://www.salumeriaroscioli.com
Via dei Giubbonari, 21
21 Via dei Giubbonari
Restaurant, gastronomy, cold cuts and cheese counter. Wines and spirits, takeaway and home deliveries In the heart of the capital, a few steps from Campo de’ Fiori, a historic restaurant with a menu based on large ingredients, on the constant dialogue with the salami counter. And cheeses and on a real, Roman and Italian cuisine...The book "Roscioli, bread, cooking and Rome" At the end of the 1950s, 11 brothers and cousins ​​arrived in Rome from Rocca di Montemonaco, a small town in the Marche region. They will all end up being bakers in the capital. Thus begins, with the story of Marco, the book "Roscioli the bread, the kitchen and Rome", a book that tells about a family, the hard work, the evolutions and the search for an ancient Roman oven. Written by Elisia Menduni, with photos by Maurizio Camagna, published by the publisher Giunti in 2016, the book, in addition to proposing 30 iconic recipes of the Oven, of the Salumeria Roscioli Restaurant and of the Roscioli Coffee, also extends into the ancient roots of the capital's bread-making , from the Romans to today. https://www.salumeriaroscioli.com
Sciue Sciue - https://www.sciuesciuemonti.com Drizz' e 'recchie' tien' a ment': st'expression' comes to you. It doesn't mean "badly": it means "ambress" and well! I will avoid dwelling on the various etymologies hypothesized for the origin of this all-Neapolitan phrase, because the meaning that comes closest to the meaning I intend to give it is "SIMPLY". The concept of simplicity paradoxically encompasses the complex work of years of research and attention. An activity made up of many trials, trying at all times to respect the concept of food as it has been handed down to me by my family and my land. My commitment consists in choosing the best ingredients and trying to rework the classics of tradition (Neapolitan and non-Neapolitan) in an always new and inviting way, proposing a different menu every day. Sciue Sciue is located in Rome, in via Urbana, in the heart of the Monti district, in a place with few seats, where I tried to recreate an intimate and welcoming atmosphere Francesco Schiavo
Via Urbana, 56
56 Via Urbana
Sciue Sciue - https://www.sciuesciuemonti.com Drizz' e 'recchie' tien' a ment': st'expression' comes to you. It doesn't mean "badly": it means "ambress" and well! I will avoid dwelling on the various etymologies hypothesized for the origin of this all-Neapolitan phrase, because the meaning that comes closest to the meaning I intend to give it is "SIMPLY". The concept of simplicity paradoxically encompasses the complex work of years of research and attention. An activity made up of many trials, trying at all times to respect the concept of food as it has been handed down to me by my family and my land. My commitment consists in choosing the best ingredients and trying to rework the classics of tradition (Neapolitan and non-Neapolitan) in an always new and inviting way, proposing a different menu every day. Sciue Sciue is located in Rome, in via Urbana, in the heart of the Monti district, in a place with few seats, where I tried to recreate an intimate and welcoming atmosphere Francesco Schiavo
Pasta Urbana - https://www.pastaurbana.it/ Gastronomy workshop that prepares fresh pasta cooked at the moment and typical dishes made with local ingredients selected in compliance with the tradition of typical Roman cuisine different pasta proposals are prepared every day as “dials of the day”. One or more seconds of the Roman tradition are also proposed daily. Special tiramisu !!!
Via Urbana, 126
126 Via Urbana
Pasta Urbana - https://www.pastaurbana.it/ Gastronomy workshop that prepares fresh pasta cooked at the moment and typical dishes made with local ingredients selected in compliance with the tradition of typical Roman cuisine different pasta proposals are prepared every day as “dials of the day”. One or more seconds of the Roman tradition are also proposed daily. Special tiramisu !!!
Osteria Pesce Fritto e Baccala - https://www.osteriapescefrittoebaccala.it Osteria Pesce Fritto e Baccalà, a place where the tradition of true Roman cuisine is combined with the right innovation. The restaurant is located in a small street – called Er vicoletto – in the heart of San Lorenzo.
Via dei Falisci, 4/8
4/8 Via dei Falisci
Osteria Pesce Fritto e Baccala - https://www.osteriapescefrittoebaccala.it Osteria Pesce Fritto e Baccalà, a place where the tradition of true Roman cuisine is combined with the right innovation. The restaurant is located in a small street – called Er vicoletto – in the heart of San Lorenzo.

City/town information

Florence, Italian Firenze, Latin Florentia, city, capital of Firenze provincia (province) and Toscana (Tuscany) regione (region), central Italy. The city, located about 145 miles (230 km) northwest of Rome, is surrounded by gently rolling hills that are covered with villas and farms, vineyards, and orchards. Florence was founded as a Roman military colony about the 1st century BCE, and during its long history it has been a republic, a seat of the duchy of Tuscany, and a capital (1865–70) of Italy. During the 14th–16th century Florence achieved preeminence in commerce and finance, learning, and especially the arts.
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Florence
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Florence, Italian Firenze, Latin Florentia, city, capital of Firenze provincia (province) and Toscana (Tuscany) regione (region), central Italy. The city, located about 145 miles (230 km) northwest of Rome, is surrounded by gently rolling hills that are covered with villas and farms, vineyards, and orchards. Florence was founded as a Roman military colony about the 1st century BCE, and during its long history it has been a republic, a seat of the duchy of Tuscany, and a capital (1865–70) of Italy. During the 14th–16th century Florence achieved preeminence in commerce and finance, learning, and especially the arts.
The origins of Bomarzo are still shrouded in mystery. Probably founded by the mysterious and unknown peoples, as Asians Meoni or Rinaldoniani, sources testify that the territory was densely inhabited first by the Etruscans and later by the Romans, who conquered it around the V century. C. and ne ascrissero population to Arniense tribe. In the witness of those times remain even today many tangible evidence in the area bomarzese: the Etruscan Pyramid, the cut and the necropolis and the ruins of a Roman aqueduct, furnaces of the Volumnis. Part of the Roman Empire until its fall, Bomarzo was below the straight line by its bishops until the abolition of the diocese which took place in the XI century. During this time he was repeatedly invaded: first by the army of King Totila during the Gothic War (535 552), followed by the Longobards of Alboin, between 569 and 590. The latest invasion was in 739 by the hand of the King Liutprando, that the subtracted to Roman Duchy together with Ameria (Amelia), Orte and Blera. Below Bomarzo was always an integral part of the Papal State, and in particular of the Delegation of Viterbo, which belonged until 1866.
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Bomarzo
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The origins of Bomarzo are still shrouded in mystery. Probably founded by the mysterious and unknown peoples, as Asians Meoni or Rinaldoniani, sources testify that the territory was densely inhabited first by the Etruscans and later by the Romans, who conquered it around the V century. C. and ne ascrissero population to Arniense tribe. In the witness of those times remain even today many tangible evidence in the area bomarzese: the Etruscan Pyramid, the cut and the necropolis and the ruins of a Roman aqueduct, furnaces of the Volumnis. Part of the Roman Empire until its fall, Bomarzo was below the straight line by its bishops until the abolition of the diocese which took place in the XI century. During this time he was repeatedly invaded: first by the army of King Totila during the Gothic War (535 552), followed by the Longobards of Alboin, between 569 and 590. The latest invasion was in 739 by the hand of the King Liutprando, that the subtracted to Roman Duchy together with Ameria (Amelia), Orte and Blera. Below Bomarzo was always an integral part of the Papal State, and in particular of the Delegation of Viterbo, which belonged until 1866.
Tivoli is a commune of the greater metropolitan area of Rome in the region of Lazio. Despite its small size and close proximity to the eternal city, Tivoli actually has a great range of fantastic attractions and sites and is a great place to visit. This commune was founded in Roman times and was an important settlement during the reign of Emperor Hadrian due to its strategic location on the River Aniene. During the Middle Ages, Tivoli came under the control of the Papal States and was fortified with a defensive network and city walls. At the time of the Renaissance, the magnificent Villa d’Este was constructed and the commune continued to prosper. Today, Tivoli has an economy based on its travertine quarries and tourism.
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Tivoli
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Tivoli is a commune of the greater metropolitan area of Rome in the region of Lazio. Despite its small size and close proximity to the eternal city, Tivoli actually has a great range of fantastic attractions and sites and is a great place to visit. This commune was founded in Roman times and was an important settlement during the reign of Emperor Hadrian due to its strategic location on the River Aniene. During the Middle Ages, Tivoli came under the control of the Papal States and was fortified with a defensive network and city walls. At the time of the Renaissance, the magnificent Villa d’Este was constructed and the commune continued to prosper. Today, Tivoli has an economy based on its travertine quarries and tourism.
Civita di Bagnoregio is a hilltop village in central Italy. It’s accessed via a pedestrian bridge from the nearby ticket office in Bagnoregio village. The Porta Santa Maria gateway was built by the Etruscans. Founded in the 7th century, the Romanesque San Donato Church sits in the main square. Nearby is the Geological and Landslides Museum, whose exhibits document projects to shore up the village's eroding hillside.
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Civita di Bagnoregio
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Civita di Bagnoregio is a hilltop village in central Italy. It’s accessed via a pedestrian bridge from the nearby ticket office in Bagnoregio village. The Porta Santa Maria gateway was built by the Etruscans. Founded in the 7th century, the Romanesque San Donato Church sits in the main square. Nearby is the Geological and Landslides Museum, whose exhibits document projects to shore up the village's eroding hillside.
Bracciano is a small town in the Italian region of Lazio, 30 kilometres northwest of Rome. The town is famous for its volcanic lake and for a particularly well-preserved medieval castle Castello Orsini-Odescalchi.
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Bracciano
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Bracciano is a small town in the Italian region of Lazio, 30 kilometres northwest of Rome. The town is famous for its volcanic lake and for a particularly well-preserved medieval castle Castello Orsini-Odescalchi.
Just 40 minutes from Rome, the spectacular town of Palestrina boasts incredible ancient ruins far from the usual tourist itineraries. It was here in ancient Preneste - as the town was known in antiquity - that the enormous temple of Fortuna rose from the cliffs of the Lazio countryside. The sanctuary was home to one of the classical world's most popular oracles, and the sacred wooden tablets that helped interpret her prophecies continued to be consulted until the 4th century AD. The powerful ruling Colonna family built their palace atop the magnificent terraces and hemicycle of the sanctuary in the middle ages.
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Palestrina
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Just 40 minutes from Rome, the spectacular town of Palestrina boasts incredible ancient ruins far from the usual tourist itineraries. It was here in ancient Preneste - as the town was known in antiquity - that the enormous temple of Fortuna rose from the cliffs of the Lazio countryside. The sanctuary was home to one of the classical world's most popular oracles, and the sacred wooden tablets that helped interpret her prophecies continued to be consulted until the 4th century AD. The powerful ruling Colonna family built their palace atop the magnificent terraces and hemicycle of the sanctuary in the middle ages.
Gardens of Ninfa. Just about any of the Castelli Romani - as the small towns nestled in the hills to the south of Rome are known - are more than worth a visit, but our favourite is bustling Frascati. Dominated by the extraordinary Baroque summer palace of Pope Clement VII Aldobrandini, the town has been a go-to destination for Romans seeking to escape the summer heat for millennia. Narrow lanes and hidden piazzas open out onto breathtaking views of the Roman campagna on all sides, but the real draw of Frascati is its brilliant restaurant scene. The Castelli Romani are known for the unrivalled quality of its raw materials, and an array of restaurants, from cheap and rustic fraschette to well-heeled eateries see hungry Romans descend every weekend in search of a cracking Sunday lunch (porchetta is, of course, obligatory). When in Rome, do as the Romans do!
Cisterna di Latina
Gardens of Ninfa. Just about any of the Castelli Romani - as the small towns nestled in the hills to the south of Rome are known - are more than worth a visit, but our favourite is bustling Frascati. Dominated by the extraordinary Baroque summer palace of Pope Clement VII Aldobrandini, the town has been a go-to destination for Romans seeking to escape the summer heat for millennia. Narrow lanes and hidden piazzas open out onto breathtaking views of the Roman campagna on all sides, but the real draw of Frascati is its brilliant restaurant scene. The Castelli Romani are known for the unrivalled quality of its raw materials, and an array of restaurants, from cheap and rustic fraschette to well-heeled eateries see hungry Romans descend every weekend in search of a cracking Sunday lunch (porchetta is, of course, obligatory). When in Rome, do as the Romans do!
This place is truly ancient. This much is obvious when you first glimpse it – a tumble of medieval houses, painted shutters gaping, scattered down the hillside like a handful of rolled dice. The town takes its name from the Roman villa that is buried somewhere beneath its erratically cobbled streets, but there is something more historic still only a few hundred yards outside the village, submerged like a dark secret in the mud of Lake Bracciano. Five thousand years before the creation of Rome, neolithic travellers from Greece or the Arab world found their way to this spot and brought with them a seismic shift: unlike the nomadic hunter-gatherers who populated the region at the time, they farmed, kept domesticated animals and created what must at the time have been a staggeringly large settlement, unprecedented within Italy. Archaeologists in scuba gear have discovered more than 3,000 oaken posts, which wer once used to support their houses.
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Anguillara Sabazia
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This place is truly ancient. This much is obvious when you first glimpse it – a tumble of medieval houses, painted shutters gaping, scattered down the hillside like a handful of rolled dice. The town takes its name from the Roman villa that is buried somewhere beneath its erratically cobbled streets, but there is something more historic still only a few hundred yards outside the village, submerged like a dark secret in the mud of Lake Bracciano. Five thousand years before the creation of Rome, neolithic travellers from Greece or the Arab world found their way to this spot and brought with them a seismic shift: unlike the nomadic hunter-gatherers who populated the region at the time, they farmed, kept domesticated animals and created what must at the time have been a staggeringly large settlement, unprecedented within Italy. Archaeologists in scuba gear have discovered more than 3,000 oaken posts, which wer once used to support their houses.